Evan Ormerod

 

Gunner 174983
76th Siege Bty, Royal Garrison Artillery

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour Register records that Evan was the son of Schofield and Winifred Ormerod, and the husband of Sarah Ellen Etches Ormerod, of 24 Hartley's Village, Fazakerley, Liverpool.

At the time of the 1901 Census, Evan was living with his widowed mother and siblings at 205 Acacia Grove, Liverpool. The details of the family taken at the time of this census are as follows.

Dwelling:

205 Acacia Grove

Census Place:

Liverpool, Lancashire, England

Source:

PRO Ref RG13; Piece 3451; Folio 82; Page 32

Marr

Age

Sex

Birthplace

Winifred ORMEROD

Wid

46

F

N Wales Carnarvon

Rel:

Head

Joshua ORMEROD

S

22

M

Lancs Liverpool

Rel:

Occ:

Son

General Labourer (Worker)

John ORMEROD

S

19

M

Lancs Liverpool

Rel:

Occ:

Son

General Labourer (Worker)

Schofield ORMEROD

S

17

M

Lancs Liverpool

Rel:

Occ:

Son

Telegraph Messenger (Worker)

Evan ORMEROD

S

14

M

Lancs Liverpool

Rel:

Occ:

Son

Box Maker (apprentice)

James ORMEROD

S

12

M

Lancs Liverpool

Rel: Son
Winifred ORMEROD S 9 F

Lancs Liverpool

Rel: Daughter
James ORMEROD S 46 M

Lancs Liverpool

Rel:

Occ:

Uncle

General Labourer (Worker)

Evan EVANS S 42 M N Wales Carnarvon

Rel:

Occ:

Visitor

General Labourer (Worker)

Evan served with 76th Royal Garrison Artillery Siege Battery. Royal Garrison Artillery Siege Batteries consisted of the largest guns and howitzers - mounted on massive fixed concrete emplacements or railways, and were consequently more or less static.

The 76th Siege Battery moved to the Ypres Salient in late May 1917 where it came under 70th Heavy Artillery Group. It later became part of the 90th Heavy Artillery Group.

Towards the end of October 1917, the Battery moved up to a position on the Frezenburg Ridge to support the British offensive against the German right flank.

At this time the Battery was involved in many heavy bombardments, intermingled with counter battery work.

Evan was killed in action on 4 November 1917, and is buried in Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Belgium (Grave Ref. XII. E. 13).

The History of 76 Siege Battery R.G.A., by L.F. Penstone, describes the events of 4 November.

"Following a hostile air raid, in which bombs were dropped close to the rear billets, a further calamity befell the Battery. During enemy strafing, a shell fell on a dugout of "A" section, many men being killed, amongst whom were Gunners A. Paternoster, A. Burton, F. [sic] Ormerod and T. Jones. Other names are not known, but it is known that Gunner "Woodrow" Wilson did excellent work assisting in the removal of the wounded, for which he was awarded the Military Medal on 24th November 1917."

Vlamertinghe, where Evan is buried, lies to the west of Ypres. For much of the First World War it lay just outside the normal range of German shell fire, and the village was consequently much used, both by artillery units and field ambulances.

Evan is commemorated, along with 85 others, on the war memorial in Emmanuel Church, Longmoor Lane, Fazakerly, Merseyside.

The Soldiers Died in the Great War Database records that Evan was born in Walton and enlisted in the Army in Liverpool.

Evan's grave in Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery